I do not doubt this at all. I have a very liberal and wonderful husband, and he still has moments when he gets frustrated - when I can see that entitlement and negative emotion come out. He's not abusive with it, but it's so much more than what say, me or my friends would do and say when he gets angry. We talked about this not long ago and he really started thinking about it. I sent him some articles about the way society and culture - including religion "trains" men to think this is fine and that it takes a bit to overcome it. Hence we get things like "mansplaining" happening, because they sometimes don't even realize they are doing it. Not that I haven't been mansplained by a woman, but it's like you said, much more common for it to be a man. So in discussing it with him, he agreed with some of that assessment. His father acted so much worse and still does, and he thinks maybe he picked up some of it from him and from the idea of manliness he was fed from childhood - don't show emotion in front of anyone except maybe your wife. So after a while, you just explode. He hates that it ever happens, and he's gotten much better at not bottling things up and reacting in a more managable way to bad things. Unfortunately, as you can see - as we all can see - not every man is willing to see the problem and make the changes. Especially not older men - like his father, who is a boomer.

(she/her/pan) I’m not to be mistaken for a well-behaved woman. I’m an ally, amateur photog, content creator, novelist, empty nester, traveler, wife, & friend.

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Rachel D Adams

(she/her/pan) I’m not to be mistaken for a well-behaved woman. I’m an ally, amateur photog, content creator, novelist, empty nester, traveler, wife, & friend.